In Memorium

John Craig, 1920-2012 (PDF 40Kb)

John C. Craig, an Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, died suddenly on Sept. 26th of complications related to cardiac disease.

Peter Dews, 1922-2012 (PDF 72Kb)

Peter B. Dews (1922–2012) passed away November 2 in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital a few steps from Harvard Medical School where he spent the majority of his career and where his intellectual and research efforts shaped the way in which the behavioral effects of drugs are studied.

Svein Dahl, 1942-2012 (PDF 186Kb)

Svein Dahl, Professor and Chair of Pharmacology at the University of Tromsø, and an ACNP Fellow, succumbed to cancer on December 8th, 2012. He died at his home near Tromsø, Norway, the city where he was born in 1942.

Jose Manuel Rodriguez Delgado, 1915-2011 (PDF 145Kb)

Described as “a technological wizard”, Jose Delgado, invented the “stimoceiver”; implanted electrodes which established two way communications with the brain in mobile animals allowing Jose to stimulate different regions, producing changes in affect and behavior.

Joseph V. Brady, 1922-2011 (PDF 108Kb)

Obituaries in the major newspapers reported Joseph Vincent Brady, Ph.D. as the researcher who sent trained monkeys and chimpanzees into orbit to prove that outer space was safe for astronauts.

Alan A. Boulton, 1936-2010 (PDF 3542Kb)

Dr. Alan Arthur Boulton was a pioneer in quantitative research on trace amines including 2-phenylethylamine, tyramine, octopamine and tryptamine, and their involvement in the etiology and pharmacotherapy of psychiatric and neurologic disorders.

Seymour Antelman, 1938-2011 (PDF 77Kb)

Dr. Seymour (Sy) Antelman was internationally known for the originality and importance of his work on biological effects of stress and the effects of psychotropic drugs on the brain and behavior.

Thomas P. Detre, 1924-2010 (PDF 64Kb)

Thomas P. Detre was a renowned psychiatrist, academic leader, health care visionary and a long-term member of the ACNP. His creative approaches provided a model for the treatment of mental and addictive disorders to move closer to that in other domains of medicine.

Frank J. Ayd Jr., 1920–2008 (PDF 250Kb)

In 1953 Dr. Ayd became the first clinician in the United States authorized by the FDA to study chlorpromazine in patients. In 1955 he published the results, initiating the modern era of psychopharmacology in this country.

Henri Begleiter, 1935-2006 (PDF 53Kb)

Henri Begleiter, Ph.D., was a leader in the fields of neuroscience, alcoholism and genetics. Dr. Beigleiter was instrumental in organizing the largest study in the world focused on the genetics of alcoholism.

Wagner H. Bridger (PDF 79Kb)

Wagner H. Bridger, M.D., published over 100 papers, was a founding member of the Society of Biological Psychiatry and President of the Society in 1988 and Editor of the journal from 1992-1997.

John J. Burns, 1920-2007 (PDF 47Kb)

John J. Burns, Ph.D., supported basic science research more than any other pharmaceutical executive, both within his company as well as in the academic community. One of his most outstanding contributions was the establishment of the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology.

C Jelleff Carr, 1910-2005 (PDF 43Kb)

C. Jelleff Carr Ph.D., a founding father of the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, died on February 15, 2005.

Jonathan O. Cole, 1925-2009 (PDF 174Kb)

Dr. Cole, a founder and early ACNP president, received the first Paul Hoch Distinguished Service Award. As CINP secretary, 1965-1969, his contributions were recognized with the coveted Pioneers in Psychopharmacology award.

Erminio Costa, 1924-2009 (PDF 219Kb)

Dr. Costa's enthusiasm and ability to translate scientific hypotheses into successful experiments were contagious for all his collaborators—more than 300 in 60 years.

Samuel Eiduson, 1918-2007 (PDF 52Kb)

Samuel Eiduson, Ph.D., one of neurochemistry's early pioneers, was the prime mover of the four authors of 'Biochemistry and Behaviour', which became the first major text for many subsequent investigators.